Last week saw us close the door on Microsoft Ignite 2017, and while the conference came and went in a blur, there was no lack of information or amazing reveals from Microsoft. While this conference serves as a great way to stay informed on all the new things that Microsoft is working on, I also find that it is a good way to get an overall sense of the company’s overall direction. With that in mind, I wanted to not only talk about some of my favorite reveals from the week but also discuss my take on Microsoft’s overall direction.

Microsoft Ignite 2017 - most important announcements

My take on the week from an Infrastructure Engineering Perspective

To put things simply….. things are changing, and they’re changing in a big way. I’ve had this gut feeling stirring for some time that the way we work with VMs and virtualization was changing, and the week of Ignite was a major confirmation of that. This is not to mention the continued shift from the on-premise model we’re used to, to the new cloud (Public, Private, and Hybrid) model that things are moving too.

It’s very clear that Microsoft is adopting what I would call the “Azure-Everywhere” approach. Sure, you’ve always been able to consume Azure using what Microsoft has publicly available, but things really changed when Azure Stack is put into the mix. Microsoft Azure Stack (MAS) is officially on the market now, and the idea of having MAS in datacenters around the world is an interesting prospect. What I find so interesting about it, is the fact that management of MAS onsite is identical to managing Azure. You use Azure Resource Manager and the same collection of tools to manage both. Pair that with the fact that Hyper-V is so abstracted and under-the-hood in MAS that you can’t even see it, and you’ve got a recipe for major day-to-day changes for infrastructure administrators.

Yes, we’ve still got Windows Server 2016, and the newly announced Honolulu management utility, but If I look out 5, or even 10 years, I’m not sure I see us working with Windows Server anymore in the way that we do so today. I don’t think VM usage will be as prevalent then as it is today either. After last week, I firmly believe that containers will be the “new virtual machine”. I think VMs will stay around for legacy workloads, and for workloads that require additional layers of isolation, but after seeing containers in action last week, I’m all in on that usage model.

We used to see VMs as this amazing cost-reducing technology, and it was for a long time. However, I saw containers do to VMs, what VMs did to physical servers. I attended a session on moving workloads to a container based model, and MetLife was on stage talking about moving some of their infrastructure to containers. In doing so they achieved:

  • -70% reduction in the number of VMs in the environment
  • -67% reduction in needed CPU cores
  • -66% reduction in overall cost of ownership

Those are amazing numbers that nobody can ignore. Given this level of success with containers, I see the industry moving to that deployment model from VMs over the next several years. As much as it pains me to say it, virtual machines are starting to look very “legacy”, and we all need to adjust our skill sets accordingly.

Big Reveals

As you know, Ignite is that time of year where Microsoft makes some fairly large announcements, and below I’ve compiled a list of some of my favorite. While this is by no means a comprehensive list,  but I feel these represent what our readers would find most interesting. Don’t agree? That’s fine! Just let me know what you think were the most important announcements in the comments. Let’s get started.

8. New Azure Exams and Certifications!

With new technologies, come new things to learn, and as such there are 3 new exams on the market today for Azure Technologies.

  • Azure Stack Operators – Exam 537: Configuring and Operating a Hybrid Cloud with Microsoft Azure Stack
  • For Azure Solutions Architects – Exam 539: Managing Linux Workloads on Azure
  • For Azure DevOps – Exam 538: Implementing Microsoft Azure DevOps Solutions

If you’re interested in pursuing any of these (Which I would Highly Recommend) then you can get more information on them at this link.

7. SQL Server 2017 is now Available

Normally I wouldn’t make much of a fuss about SQL Server as I’m not much of a SQL guy myself, but Microsoft did something amazing with this release. SQL Server 2017 will run on Windows, Linux, and inside of Docker Containers. Yes, you read correctly. SQL Server 2017 will run on Linux and inside of docker containers, which opens up a whole new avenue of providing SQL workloads. Exciting times indeed!

6. Patch Management from the Azure Portal

Ever wanted to have WSUS available from the Azure portal? Now you have it. You can easily view, and deploy patches for your Azure based workloads directly from the Azure portal. This includes Linux VMs as well, which is great news as more and more admins are finding themselves managing Linux workloads these days!

5. PowerShell now Available in Azure CLI.

When Azure CLI was announced and released, many people were taken aback at the lack of PowerShell support. This was done for a number of reasons that I won’t get into in this article, but regardless, it has been added in now. It is now possible with Azure CLI to deploy a VM with a single PowerShell cmdlet and more. So, get those scripts ready!

4. Azure File Sync in Preview

I know many friends and colleagues that have been waiting for something like this. You can essentially view this as next-generation DFS. (Though it doesn’t use the same technology). It essentially allows you to sync your on-premise file servers with an Azure Files account for distributed access to the stored information around the globe.

3. Quality of Life Improvements for Windows Containers

While there were no huge reveals in the container space, Windows Server 1709 was announced and contains a lot of improvements and optimizations for running containers on Windows Server. This includes things like smaller images and support for Linux Containers running on Windows Server. I did an Interview with Taylor Brown from the Containers team, which you can view below for more information.

2. Nested Virtualization in Azure for Production Workloads

Yes, I know, nested virtualization in Azure has been announced for some time. However, what I found different was Microsoft’s Insistence that it could also be used for production workloads. During Scott Guthrie’s Keynote, Corey Sanders actually demonstrated the use of the M-Series (Monster) VM in Azure being used to host production workloads with nested VMs. While not ideal in every scenario obviously, this is simply another tool that we have at our disposal for added flexibility in our day-to-day operations.

If you’re interested, I actually interviewed Rick Claus from the Azure Compute team about this. That Interview can be seen below

1. Project Honolulu

This one is for the folks that are still strictly interested in only the on-prem stuff. Microsoft revealed and showed us the new Project Honolulu management utility for on-premise workloads. Honolulu, takes the functionality of all the management tools and MMC snap-ins that we’ve been using for years and packages them up into a nice easy to use web-UI. It’s worth a look if you haven’t seen it yet. We even have a nice article on our blog about it if you’re interested in reading more!

Wrap-Up

As I mentioned, this was by no means a comprehensive list, but we’ll be talking about items (From this list and some not mentioned) from Ignite on our blogs for some time. So, be sure to keep an eye on our blog if you’re interested in more information.

Additionally, if you attended Microsoft Ignite, and you saw a feature or product you think is amazing that is not listed above, be sure to let us know in the comments section below!